Viewing entries tagged
ayurveda

Putting together Ayurvedic tea blends for the waiting room. Looking forward to sharing these with patients and guests.  

 According to ancient Ayurvedic medicine we are all unique and are dominant in one or two main doshas, or constitutions. They are the energy that makes up  our body, mind, and spirit. 

 It’s important to stay balanced and bring your main dosha into harmony within yourself and with the outside environment.  

 One way of doing so is using herbs and teas to suite your personal dosha.  

 We also sell these blends at the clinic. Stop by for a sample today : ) 

 #dartmouth #naturopathic #herbs #halifax #health #tea #vata #pitta #kapha #ayurveda #waitingroom @mountainroseherbs 

  (at Dartmouth Naturopathic Health Centre)

Putting together Ayurvedic tea blends for the waiting room. Looking forward to sharing these with patients and guests.

According to ancient Ayurvedic medicine we are all unique and are dominant in one or two main doshas, or constitutions. They are the energy that makes up our body, mind, and spirit.

It’s important to stay balanced and bring your main dosha into harmony within yourself and with the outside environment.

One way of doing so is using herbs and teas to suite your personal dosha.

We also sell these blends at the clinic. Stop by for a sample today : )

#dartmouth #naturopathic #herbs #halifax #health #tea #vata #pitta #kapha #ayurveda #waitingroom @mountainroseherbs

(at Dartmouth Naturopathic Health Centre)

Mango smoothies. Just slice up a mango, add 1-2 tbsp of cashew butter, 1 cup of unsweetened coconut milk and a pinch of cardamom. This drink is refreshing but also warming, great for a sunny end of winter day! 

 If you’ve never used cardamom much in the kitchen it’s worth a try. Its the worlds third most expensive spice, known as the queen of spice. Used to stimulate digestion especially bloating and gas, as an anti microbial, great for respiratory congestion, and is also an urinary tonic. It’s pacifying to all doshas.  

 #dartmouth #naturopathic #health #halifax #ayurveda #mango #cardamom #cashewbutter #smoothie #raw (at Dartmouth Naturopathic Health Centre)

Mango smoothies. Just slice up a mango, add 1-2 tbsp of cashew butter, 1 cup of unsweetened coconut milk and a pinch of cardamom. This drink is refreshing but also warming, great for a sunny end of winter day!

If you’ve never used cardamom much in the kitchen it’s worth a try. Its the worlds third most expensive spice, known as the queen of spice. Used to stimulate digestion especially bloating and gas, as an anti microbial, great for respiratory congestion, and is also an urinary tonic. It’s pacifying to all doshas.

#dartmouth #naturopathic #health #halifax #ayurveda #mango #cardamom #cashewbutter #smoothie #raw (at Dartmouth Naturopathic Health Centre)

Sunday mornings & herbal coffee… take that, spring time change! 

 Here we have organic roasted dandelion root, chicory root, carob and maca! Great way to get a dark, bitter cup of warmth all while cleansing the liver, stimulating digestion, boosting energy and nourishing the adrenal (stress) glands.  

 The debate over real coffee beans being a health food still continues. Some pros are its antioxidant value (which you can get de-caffeinated btw), it reduces risk of diabetes, and it increases cognition. Some cons are its association with inflammatory markers in the blood, auto immune disease, osteoporosis, anxiety, and it’s laden with pesticides.  

 Caffeine and coffee are yang substances. They give a lot of energy in short bursts, but don’t replenish and rebuild, and may cause you to feel more depleted in the long run.  

 If your thinking of making changes my suggestion is focus on organic first, consider Swiss water decaf next, and then try herbal coffee and herbal teas… They are actually pretty tasty! 

 We carry this herbal blend at the clinic if you’re curious to try! 

 #coffee #herbs #dartmouth #halifax #naturopathic #health #maca #timechange #yinyang #ayurveda (at Dartmouth Naturopathic Health Centre)

Sunday mornings & herbal coffee… take that, spring time change!

Here we have organic roasted dandelion root, chicory root, carob and maca! Great way to get a dark, bitter cup of warmth all while cleansing the liver, stimulating digestion, boosting energy and nourishing the adrenal (stress) glands.

The debate over real coffee beans being a health food still continues. Some pros are its antioxidant value (which you can get de-caffeinated btw), it reduces risk of diabetes, and it increases cognition. Some cons are its association with inflammatory markers in the blood, auto immune disease, osteoporosis, anxiety, and it’s laden with pesticides.

Caffeine and coffee are yang substances. They give a lot of energy in short bursts, but don’t replenish and rebuild, and may cause you to feel more depleted in the long run.

If your thinking of making changes my suggestion is focus on organic first, consider Swiss water decaf next, and then try herbal coffee and herbal teas… They are actually pretty tasty!

We carry this herbal blend at the clinic if you’re curious to try!

#coffee #herbs #dartmouth #halifax #naturopathic #health #maca #timechange #yinyang #ayurveda (at Dartmouth Naturopathic Health Centre)

Has the winter got you beat? Then eat a beet! 

 I just opened my first jar of homemade pickled beets thanks to @mitchoo and they were delish! 

 Beets are so full of bio available minerals and vitamins including iron that they help build blood and energy.  They cleanse the liver, are high in antioxidants, and in nutrients that lower cholesterol and protect the cardiovascular system.  

 Beets are great to eat during a change of season as try are very grounding. Wonderful for vata types, and if cooked pitta types.  

 #dartmouth #halifax #naturopathic #health #beets #ayurveda #pickles #nutrition  (at Dartmouth Naturopathic Health Centre)

Has the winter got you beat? Then eat a beet!

I just opened my first jar of homemade pickled beets thanks to @mitchoo and they were delish!

Beets are so full of bio available minerals and vitamins including iron that they help build blood and energy. They cleanse the liver, are high in antioxidants, and in nutrients that lower cholesterol and protect the cardiovascular system.

Beets are great to eat during a change of season as try are very grounding. Wonderful for vata types, and if cooked pitta types.

#dartmouth #halifax #naturopathic #health #beets #ayurveda #pickles #nutrition (at Dartmouth Naturopathic Health Centre)

I love this glass tea cup with built in strainer from Sawadee tea house in Halifax. It has a plastic outer insulating layer keeping it cool to touch and unbreakable. Great for loose teas and medicinal herbal powders. 

 Inside I’m drinking holy basil tulsi tea, which Ayurveda considers an elixir of life. It eases stress and strengthens the immune system. A great warming tea for the winter months.  

 #dartmouth #naturopathic #health #tea #tulsi #sawadee #ayurveda #winter #commoncold  (at Dartmouth Naturopathic Health Centre)

I love this glass tea cup with built in strainer from Sawadee tea house in Halifax. It has a plastic outer insulating layer keeping it cool to touch and unbreakable. Great for loose teas and medicinal herbal powders.

Inside I’m drinking holy basil tulsi tea, which Ayurveda considers an elixir of life. It eases stress and strengthens the immune system. A great warming tea for the winter months.

#dartmouth #naturopathic #health #tea #tulsi #sawadee #ayurveda #winter #commoncold (at Dartmouth Naturopathic Health Centre)

Spring Sprouts!

In light of the beautiful spring like weather we’ve encountered today in the HRM I’d like to share a post about sprouting!

Why Sprout?

Sprouting is the act of germinating any grain, seed, nut or legume to enhance its nutritive value. It’s an essential part of any diet that is predominant in raw foods as it decreases anti-nutrients and increases alkalinity, enzymes, proteins, vitamins and minerals (up to 2000%) all while increasing digestion. For example, 5 grams of broccoli sprouts is equivalent to 50 grams of broccoli with regards to sulforaphane (which strongly inhibits cancer and increases liver detoxification).

Many sprouts also contain higher amounts of phytoestrogens when compared to their beans. These include mung beans, clover, soybeans, yellow peas, geeen lentils, chick peas, fenugreek and adzuki beans. Phytoestrogens help us balance estrogen levels and decrease the ratio of harmful estrogens to protective estrogens.

How to Sprout?

It’s easy! Try not to get caught up in any fancy techniques or gadgets in the beginning. I’ll run you through the steps for sprouting broccoli and mung beans, I encourage you to give this a go, especially if you have young children in the house who love to watch things transform!

Brocolli:

1. Start by purchasing broccoli seeds. A common brand is Mumms which can be found at Planet Organic in Quinpool Rd. Take a mason jar and either wrap mesh over top secured by an elastic band or purchase a premade cover such as the one you see in this photo. Add 1 tbsp of seeds and place inside the jar.

2. Fill the jar with cold water and rinse the seeds then fill the jar up again and allow the seeds to soak overnight.

3. In the morning rinse, repeat and place the jar upside down as seen in this picture in a bowl for support. Now all you have to do is allow the seeds to sprout in a shady area of the kitchen for 3-5 days. It’s important to rinse them out 2x a day.

BROCOLLI SPROUTS are eaten to protect from cancer (including breast, stomach, prostate, skin, colon and bladder), to decrease LDL cholesterol, increasing phase 2 detoxification in the liver, increase cardiovascular health, and protect the body from diabetes complications. Try them in green smoothies, on top of eggs, in salads or sandwiches. They have a radish type taste, and can add some zap into any meal.

Mung Bean Sprouts:

1. Mung beans are much larger than broccoli seeds, they are also require pressure to grow. First start with about ½ a cup of green beans, rinse and soak overnight.

2. In the morning rinse the mung beans and place in a open faced strainer on top of a bowl (so dripping water doesn’t leak). On top of the mung beans you need to place something to put them under a little pressure (like a heavy bowl). This pressure will allow them to grow thick and crispy!

3. Rinse them 2x every day for about 3-5 days allowing them to grow in a shady part of the kitchen. 

MUNG BEANS: These are the “typical” bean sprout you’ll find at the grocery store used most commonly in Chinese cooking. They’ve been used as a nourishing food for over 3000 years! They play a central roll in Ayurvedic (Indian) cleansing, known for their place in Kitchari, a dish of rice, beans and herbs. They are much more readily absorbed than other beans as they contain fewer oligosaccharides, leading to less gas and bloating. Sprouting them and combining them with digestive herbs also increases their digestion. One cup of sprouts has only 30 calories and up to 3 grams of protein! They are a great source of Vitamin K (extremely important in bone health and Vitamin D absorption), high in Vitamin C, and B Vitamins.  

A sprouted tridoshic ayurvedic kitchari (recipe to come!) yummm…

 
“Never cut a tree down in the wintertime. Never make a negative decision in the low time. Never make your most important decisions when you are in your worst moods. Wait. Be patient. The storm will pass. The spring will come.” ~ Robert H. Schulle

Quixotic Quiche

Another food box, another week…a marvelous week that is, for my culinary skills. I made my first quiche from scratch, dabbling into my French heritage. I had to use up some broccoli, leeks and mushrooms, so I just did a recipe search in goggle with those three guys and up popped an easy quiche recipe click here 

Gluten free crust:

1. 1.5 cups of gluten free flour with Xantham gum (bobs red mill or bulk barn)

2. ½ cup of cold fat (organic butter or coconut oil)

3. pinch of salt

4. 1 tsp of ice cold water if necessarry

Add all ingredients together (only use the water if it’s too dry after a good pounding). It’s easiest to mix ‘em up in a food processor. I just used my hands until it became nice and doughy and that worked just fine. Then roll it out and plop into a pie pan. It may break up while you try to do this, in that case just press in into the contour of the pan. Chill for 1 hour before pre-baking for 10 minutes on 400 degrees, remove, add the filing and the bake again.

Quiche filling:

1 tbsp olive oil
1 leek
8 mushrooms
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1 broccoli crown
2 stems of fresh rosemary (note the rosemary bush in the picture aboutve :)
3 eggs
1 ¼ cups unsweetened almond milk
½ tsp salt
½ tsp pepper
Raw organic cheddar cheese (optional)


Chop up the leeks and mince the garlic, saute them in the olive oil in a frying pan over the stove. After 5 minutes add in the broccoli, mushroom and rosemary, cook for 10 minutes. Place in the pre-baked pie crust. In a separate bowl mix up the eggs, almond milk, salt and pepper. Pour into the pie and top with the cheese. Bake in the oven on 350 degrees for 1 hour.

Spicey spotlight ROSEMARY:

Rosemary is known to have memory enhancing properties as an essential oil. Get out that diffuser for your next round of midterms! Medically it has components shown to decrease the risk of stroke and alzheimer’s, heart disease and inflammation. In Ayurvedic medicine it’s known as a pungent spice that eases menstruation, headaches, harmonizes the heart and emotions. Interestingly enough, historically it’s been used as a symbol for remembrance during weddings and funerals.